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Barre Arts and Business News

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From left, David Mears, Executive Director of Audubon Vermont; Rhoni Basden, Executive Director of Vermont Works for Women; Breck Knauft, Executive Director of Vermont Youth Conservation Corps; and Tom Longstreth, Executive Director of ReSOURCE. Courtesy photo.

New Business in Barre: Rooted Yoga in the Blanchard Block

Rooted Yoga opened for business in its Main Street, Blanchard Block location in Barre on Nov. 1 with an array of mini classes and a ribbon cutting ceremony. Rooted Yoga is opening in the former Imagine Yoga space, with some of the same staff. 

Rooted Yoga offers an array of classes and workshops in various styles of yoga and belly dance as well as bodywork practices such as reiki and shamanic healing. It is woman-owned and -operated with a staff of 10 and offers vending space to other woman-owned businesses. 

On Saturday, Nov. 27, Rooted Yoga is hosting a holiday market at the studio featuring local vendors, including:  

  • Marissa Hall, Ayurvedic Essentials
  • Emily Bloom Dwyer, ReBlooming Arts
  • Joanne Reynolds, Treasure Hunt (vintage and retro jewelry)
  • Callie Flanders, Callie’s Creations (scented soy candles)
  • Anne Darrow, Luca Designs (hand-crafted jewelry)

“We could all use a little extra self care and the studio has practices to nurture the whole being, creating a sense of wholeness for the physical, mental, and spiritual bodies,” said studio owner, Christine Morris.  Rooted Yoga can be found online at rootedyogavt.com.

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—Cassandra Hemenway

Greenwald’s Art Featured at Barre Cafe

Montpelier artist Judy Greenwald will be featuring her work for sale at Barre City’s Espresso Bueno until Dec. 29. Courtesy photo.

The original art of Montpelier pastel artist Judy Greenwald will be featured at Espresso Bueno coffee house in Barre Nov. 17 through Dec. 29.  Thirty-seven of Greenwald’s works will be for sale at the café, with prices reduced for the holidays. Prints of each work can also be purchased on site.

“Every wall in Bueno will be covered with Judy’s art,” said Espresso Bueno talent booker “Lovejoy,” (who goes only by this name, sans surname).  “She has an opportunity to sell works right off the wall if folks want to buy, or they can just come into the café to browse and be surrounded by all her vibrantly colored pastels and just enjoy looking at them.” 

Greenwald, 87, is known for her vivid use of color in works such as “His Majesty,” which depicts a regal rooster, and “Underwater Ballet,” a study in fantastic fish. Greenwald also derives inspiration from the Vermont landscape, with titles such as “Stowe Waterfall,” “Road to Sparrow Farm,” and “Berlin Farm.”

Lovejoy said she became aware of Greenwald’s work through a mutual colleague who “remarked on the fact that there was this gal living in this little Montpelier cottage, and she’s surrounded by her life’s work, and her art is just so vibrant and so alive.”

Lovejoy said when she saw Greenwald’s work, she was enchanted.

“I said, ‘Oh, we’ve got to get this out into the world,’” she said. “You know, Vermont has a plethora of senior artists, and it may be the case that those folks are more homebound now and don’t get out too much, which makes it all the more important to get their art out there.”  

—Press Release

‘Serve, Learn & Earn’ Celebrates in Barre

Four Vermont nonprofits gathered recently at the Vermont Granite Museum to announce a new collaborative workforce development effort called Serve, Learn & Earn as they celebrated the graduation of one of the funded programs (ReSOURCE’s Construction 101 training). 

Serve, Learn & Earn is a collaboration of Audubon Vermont, ReSOURCE, Vermont Works for Women, and Vermont Youth Conservation Corps. The group is centered on the shared vision that every Vermonter should have a viable pathway to employment and affordable education in exchange for serving their state. Participants serve by working on important projects in priority areas such as climate, housing, and outdoor recreation. 

In 2021, the Vermont Legislature recognized the importance of this work — and this collaboration — with an appropriation of $1.85 million, administered by the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks, and Recreation. This funding supports each organization’s direct service training programs, increasing opportunities for Vermonters to obtain jobs that meet their needs, even during these challenging times, while also meeting the needs of Vermont’s businesses facing workforce shortages. 

—Press Release